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From the Archives of Western Newspapers

Posted on October 26, 2023 by admin

By Samantha Johnson
Southern Alberta Newspapers
Local Journalism Initiative Reporter

October 25, 1883 – The Brandon Weekly Mail

The Winnipeg Sun says a cousin of Nicholas Flood Davim has claimed the British championship by jumping 23 feet and 2 inches. Those who saw the leaps of Nicholas himself when he was after that refractory reporter, who criticized a lecture that was never given, say the orator of the west can jump that distance himself when aroused to a boiling point.

the Toronto Telegram, because of writings against R.C. Bishops, has received a letter that states, “if they don’t desist, they may wish they had never been born.” Rowdyism of that stamp should be punished with a hemp cord. The Telegram may have overstepped the bounds of propriety in their criticism, as overzealous journalists often do, but if they have done anything wrong, there is the law to make it right, without the interference of such villainy as penned the anonymous letter.

Typhoid fever does not prevail in Moosejaw, as has been reported. The inhabitants swear vengeance at the Portage la Prairie paper that started the story.

The Queen has issued a private memorandum to the occupants of a certain royal palace for a correction or reformation of manners in the matter of gambling.

October 22, 1910 – Bow Island Review

In Springfield, Missouri, middleweight champion Stanley Ketchel died last night as a result of being shot by ranch hand Walter Hurtz. The shooting took place 40 miles east at the ranch of Ketchel’s friend. A special train was ordered to rush Ketchel to hospital and doctors were on board to attend to him. He regained consciousness at one point and there was hope he would recover. A 22-caliber bullet has been found in the room where the shooting took place and it is believed this might be the one that killed him.

A prevalence of cattle stealing in Southern Alberta is causing the court dockets to be filled with an unusual number of cases that carry severe penalties. Frank Mark near Elkwater was charged in Irvine with having rebranded and earmarked a two-year-old bull belonging to S. Gigie. He was convicted and fined $25, plus costs of $29 and damages to Gigie of $23.

The first wedding in Bow Island took place at the hotel. Mr. Geo Lomas, manager of the Pioneer Meat Market, married C.A. Powell from Iron Springs, AB. The couple will reside on a farm three miles from Bow Island.

October 23, 1912 – The Wainwright Star

Former secretary of the town council Mr. Fieldhouse was present for both the morning and afternoon sessions of the council. It was ascertained what steps would be taken for a complete reparation of the town’s loss by the late secretary. The attorney-general in Edmonton told Fieldhouse he was not anxious to press charges against him but the town was pushing for it. The matter has been long drawn out and Fieldhouse given numerous chances to return the books, if he knows where they are. The council has further extended the deadline for restoring the books or preparing new records. There remains the possibility that Fieldhouse is not the only offender and might not be criminally responsible.

BC real estate dealers are being accused of victimizing English and Scotch settlers buy selling them, at long-range, fruit ranches situated on the tops of mountains.

R.J. Ferguson of Calgary returned today from an auto trip of 1,800 miles. He is the first to drive into the Peace River district and got as far as Grouard. He met with no mishaps and carried gasoline and all his supplies in the car. The best days run was 168 miles and the worst was 90 miles in seven hours. Ferguson brought back with him ripe tomatoes and corn grown in the area.

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